Workday Wednesday-The Cigar Maker

No doubt I had looked at the 1870 census many times before, and saw that my ancestor Esram Bough’s occupation/trade was listed as a Cigar Maker, but this time was different. I noticed that most of the ancestors of the family (George A. Bough) sons’ occupations were: Clerks, Shoemakers, and Taylors throughout the 1800’s.

I knew that Sugar was the main industry, and Tobacco was just another crop that was grown on small plots. However, due to my lack of knowledge of any cigar industry in the Danish West Indies, it was difficult for me to understand the profession and its dynamics. Therefore, I decided to do a further research focusing on tobacco.

I learned that Denmark only imported tobacco from the Danish West Indies for their own cigar production, and those Cigars that were produced in the Danish West Indies were never officially imported to Denmark as a finished product. Cigar-making on St. Croix was most likely made out of the family home. Most of these sole proprietors worked alone at a long table with their own tools, rolling cigars.(http://www.danishcigars.com/danish-cigar-history/)

Although, Esram did not establish a generation of Cigar makers in the family, however he made a profitable living out of it. I honor my ancestor, the Cigar Maker, for embracing a profession that took not only skill, and concentration, but a sense of pride that went into the making of a fine cigar.

omx 1214_Page_1

Esram Bough

Esram Bough

Esram Samuel Bough (twin) (1846-1900) was born just two years before the emancipation of the slaves in the Danish West Indies. He was the son of George A. Bough and Susan Crow-Bough. He was classified as a free person of color. At the age of 13, he was an apprentice in a trade. As an adult his profession was listed as a Cigar Maker. Esram Samuel Bough died in June 1900 at the age of 54 in St. Croix, Danish West Indies.

  3 comments for “Workday Wednesday-The Cigar Maker

  1. December 19, 2012 at 10:44 pm

    I enjoyed learning about the cigars manufacturing in the Danish West Indies.

    Like

  2. December 28, 2012 at 12:35 am

    Isn’t it amazing how we can look at our census files many times and finally see something that we’ve missed? Wonderful information indeed!

    Like

  3. Shirley de Chabert-Highfield
    January 6, 2013 at 10:57 am

    Amazing!

    Shirley

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

A.Hiroko

Imagine. Indulge. Inspire

Reclaiming Kin

Taking Back What Was Once Lost

Sangeetha

~Inspiration~Food~Travel~Lifestyle~

SquarePegDem's Blog

A corruption crusher & thought-leader giving voice to unplugged opinions and perspectives.

Astrolabe Sailing

Sailing, yachts, adventure and sailing around the world!

DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy

Discovering Your Ancestors - One Gene at a Time

the mix that makes up me

stories of my ancestors & collateral kin

Opening Doors in Brick Walls

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” ~ Alexander Graham Bell

The Creola Genealogist

Cape Verdean Genealogy and History

BitterSweet

Linked Through Slavery

Finding Eliza

Just another WordPress.com site

HairBlues

Focusing on hair, health, exercise, essential oils, and other healthwise topics

%d bloggers like this: