Category: Genealogy

Black History celebrates the narrative of Harold G. Bough, Merchant Marine.

We are one week in the celebration of Black History Month, a month of recognizing the achievements and contributions of African-American people in the diaspora. For those of us who value our ancestry and history, join me in focusing on your family’s contributions that made a meaningful impact to your community and the larger society.

As we do our research, we will discover the many small and large influences that our family members have made to enhance the quality of life of others, and which still remains an impact today.

So get to work, dig into the wealth of information out there, then document and share your proud heritage weekly.   Be sure to leave a link to your post in the comments of this post.

I have already started and so far, I have uncovered that My great, great, great-uncle Harold Bough had served 24 years in the US Navy when the Spanish-American War was being fought.

A 1932 St. Croix Tribute Newspaper Article also indicated that he was in Chinese waters for the Boxer Rebellion with the Party of American Surveyors in 1894, he crossed the proposed route from the Atlantic to Pacific of the Nicaraguan canal, a project that was considered before the present Panama Canal Route had been decided upon, and from 1879-83 he was stationed in the Pacific during the Peruvian and Chilean War.

haroldarticletribune

Printout about Harold Bough from G. James Fleming Article “Journal and Guide of VA

Harold Bough was the son of Ida Rosalie Keutsch and George Bough both of St. Croix US Virgin Islands formerly the Danish West Indies.   He met and married Maggie J. Keeling of Norfolk Virginia and settled in Portsmouth Virginia together they had eight (8) daughters known as the “Bough Girls”

Harold Bough who left the shores of St. Croix to St. Thomas and sailed around the World twice as a Merchant Marine was honored to serve.  Harold Bough died in Portsmouth, VA at the age of 84 years old.

haroldboughmili-headstoneapp

Rosalyn Bough applies for Military Headstone for her father Harold Bough.

 

As Bell Hooks explains, “reclaim their history, call their names, state their particulars,  gather and remember, to share our inheritance”

The theme:   Weekly Black History Narrative  (from your family tree.)

I look forward to reading your story.  Don’t forget to leave a comment with a link to your weekly Black History Narrative.  Or contact me by email at its.sheldew@gmail.com

 

52 Ancestors #51 Nice -Anita Bough-Moorhead (1918-2015)

Amy Johnson Crow “no story too small” suggested that we write a story to Define “nice” however you want to 🙂

Our family historian Nita, shares a “Nice” Ole Time Christmas Story with her grandson  Dominick Scott.

NITA

Anita Chanette Elaine (Bough) Moorhead

Anita Moorhead was born on October 25, 1918, the daughter of Joseph E.  Bough and Alice M. (Smith) Bough both of St. Croix, Virgin Islands.  She is also the granddaughter of David Bough and Elizabeth (Prince) Bough as well as Emma (Mueller) Smith of St. Croix and William Smith of Tortola.  In 1942, she married Adrian L. Moorheard.

Nita, as she was affectionately called by family was a very effective Teacher as early as 1937 at the Frederiksted Grammar School and the Christiansted Grammar School.  After 40 years of teaching she retired from Pearl B Larsen School in 1977.   She received the award of “teacher of the year” occasionally.  As a teacher she impacted the lives of many Virgin Islanders.  She was an active member of the Lord God of Sabaoth Church overseeing confirmation classes and acolyte training.

Anita Bough-Moorhead was our Family historian.  Cousin Nita was proud of her Bough Heritage and was an inspiration for the first Bough family reunion in the late 90’s.  She created the first family tree for the reunion and as my interest in the history and genealogy grew, we shared information. I became 100% consumed with this knowledge and began blogging my genealogical journey.   Her love and the way she reached out and kept up with family was just incredible.

More importantly, she shared with her grandson Dominick Scott a treasure trove on how Christmas was celebrated when she was a child.  Each time I read this composition by my cousin, I get into the seasonal mood.   I hope you will enjoy this as much as I have each year.  Curl up with your sweet bread and guava berry drink and listen as dear “Nita” describes to her grandson about an Ole Time Christmas.

SONY DSC

Old-Time Crucian Christmas. Whim Museum, St. Croix, USVI personal photograph by author 2013

An Ole Time Christmas written by Dominick Scott

According to my great-grandmother, Anita Moorhead in the 1920’s the Christmas season in St. Croix began after Thanksgiving.  People started to get the stores ready.  Most of the goods came from Denmark and England.  Most of the merchants were natives; there were one or two European merchants and some Puerto Ricans.  Her father Joseph Bough was a merchant at that time.  Everywhere there was a festive air. The stores would be decorated with garlands and other Christmas decoration like colored lanterns.

Women with large wooden trays sat under the galleries of Company Street and King Street selling candies.  The candies were all homemade.  They were: coconut sugar cakes that were colored brown, pink and white; brown, white, or pink losenges; peppermint candies; peanut sugar cake, and dundaslau.

candy

“Coming Home to St Croix” Old time candy,  St. Croix USVI personal photograph by author 2015

There was also a candy that was similar to a lollipop that was shaped in the form of an animal to which a stick has been inserted called sugar babies.  The sticks were decorated with allkinds of colored paper.  Sweet Breads and all kinds of buns were sold.  Rusk was a small sweet bun that twas cut in half and baked until it became very hard and crusty.  People ate it with their tea.

On Christmas Eve night, the streets were crowded with people because most everybody lived in town. The only people who lived in the country were those who worked on the estates.  There were no fireworks as there is today, but people would walk around blowing horns and lighting Roman candles and firing thunderbolts.   After church, carolers went about the streets singing Christmas carols and visiting various homes.   They were given money, sweet bread, guava berry liqueur or cherry herring drink.

Sweet bread and ham were delicacies for the season.  Breakfast on Christmas morning consisted of sweet bread and ham with cocoa or tea.  All during the season sweet bread and ham were eaten for breakfast.  Dinner was either baked chicken or duck, which was usually raised by the family. There was no cold storage. There was only an ice box.  With the chicken or duck, potato stuffing and home gown vegetables like beets, carrots, corn, or string beans were eaten. There were no soda factories.  The common drinks were maubi, ginger beer, or punch made from many of our fruits – guava, gooseberry, plum, sour sop and tamarind.  People visited families and friends after dinner.  One would always be served sweet bread, guava berry liqueur, cherry herring, or Danish brandy.

Christmas Second Day was one of great celebrations.  There were masquerades dancing throughout the streets from noon until six in the evening.  This occurred on all the streets not just down one street.  People would look out their window and the troupes would stop and dance under the windows.  People would throw down money for them.  Some people would follow the troupes that they liked best, just like today when people follow a tramp.  The types of troupes were The Bull, David and Goliath, Donkey Want Water, Indians, Mocko Jumbies and other pretty troupes.

mockojumbionpalmtree

Personal photograph by author 2015

Christmas at that time was joyous and safe.  There were no crimes or violence.  Everyone had a good time.

52ancestors-2015

On March 19, 2015 we lost our dear relative, she was 97 years old.               Nita=Nice.

 

Source:

http://www.visharoots.org/  St. Croix Population Database

http://home.ancestry.com/ US Federal Census, 1920,1930,1940

In Celebration of Life Anita Bough Moorhead. St. Croix: funeral booklet., 2015.

Scott, Dominick. “Ole Time Christmas.” (class composition)

 

 

 

 

Sunday’s Obituary – Miss Sarah O. Bough, 1931

For this blogging prompt: I selected an ancestor who was on the threshold of adulthood, as well as a freshman entering Hampton Institute in Virginia. In my mind, Sarah experienced the feelings of arrival and gratefulness before her life was cut short.

obit edited

Portsmouth VA- September 25 1931 –  Miss Sarah Otella Bough, 18 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bough, passed away at the residence of her parents ,  304 Effingham Street Thursday, September 25th after a short illness.  The funeral services were held Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Emanuel A.M.E church, Rev J.A. Young, the pastor officiated, assisted by Rev L.L. Berry, pastor of St. Johns Church in Norfolk.

Papers were read from the Norcom High School Faculty and from the Church Class No. 29.  Miss Myrtle Petrey sang, “When It Comes To The End of a Perfect Day” and Messrs.’ James Driver, George Morgan, Leonard Western, and Wesley Fagan sang,  “Raise Me Jesus To Thy Bosom” The Norcom Fellowship Choir rendered “Crossing the Bar”.  The Choir sang two selections.

Miss Bough is survived by her parents and five sisters, Roslind V., Katryn Y., Italina A., Charlotte and Mrs. Gwendolyn Fortseque.  She was a graduate of Norcom High School and entered as a freshman at Hampton Institute last September to pursue college work.  Intermit was in Mt. Olive Cemetery.

Sarah Otella Bough is my first cousin 3x removed.

New Journal and Guide (1921-2003) Oct 3, 1931

ProQuest Historical Newspapers Norfolk Journal and Guide (1921 – 2003)
Pg. 8

Surnames

Surnames:

My Mother’s Family, St Croix, US Virgin Islands

BOUGH

My mother is Joyce Bough-Matthews.  I have traced the family back five generations to the baptism of George Anthony Bough in 1805.   An 1816  Danish Census was the starting point for my interest in family history.

Gasper

My grandmother was Caroline Gasper who married Julius C. Bough in 1932, New York City.

Beaudhuy

The Beaudhuys’ was a line to my Bough family (George Bough, Sr. had children with Sarah Beaudhuy daughter of Slave-holder Anthony Beaudhuy) I have developed and published a family tree on this line at ancestry.com

Holstein

My great grandmother’s sister was Erroline Johnson, she had a child with Major Casper von Holstein.  Although oral family history supported the relationship with the Bough family, it was while researching on-line my African ancestor, I discovered the Holstein-Bough  connection through census records of the Danish West Indies.   Casper Holstein-Joseph Philanthropist, Gambler, Activists of the Virgin Islands.

Muckles

This is another line to my Bough family.  Recently, through cousins I met via my blog we were able to take down a Genealogical Wall that had been up for decades.  With their assistance brick by brick that wall tumbled down. Prior to this excavation, I had given up on ever finding the record of Julia Bough- Muckle  father.   I was satisfied with family oral history.   As a result of team collaboration, we now know that we share the same 4th great grandfather in George Anthony Bough.   Ever-grateful.

Surnames to be continued

Surname Saturday-Boughs of US Virgin Islands

Although the Boughs have been in the Danish West Indies (now US Virgin Islands) since the 18th Century, family lore has it that the ancestors were living in County Cavan, Ireland before coming to St. Croix. As was typical during the 18th and 19th Centuries, the St. Croix population was mostly of English, Irish and Scottish descendants.

The St. Croix Free Males and Militia Combined document established, during 1807-1808, that George Bough, a White male, was in private business as well as a member of the St. Croix Volunteer Company in Christiansted. It is presumed that he met and had a relationship with Sarah Beaudhuy, (1772-1868) a former mulatto slave of Anthony Beaudhuy, who was set free in 1797.

Together they had two sons: David who died at the age of 10 years old and George Bough who becomes the Patriarch of the Bough family of the Virgin Islands. George Anthony Bough fathered 11 children which includes a set of twins and one daughter.

The Bough surname is an old family name that intertwines with the History of the U.S. Virgin Islands Government, Business and Civic Organizations.

In an attempt to gather and compile surnames I thought I would look at my direct Bough lineage beginning with the Patriarch classified as a free person of color because of his mother’s Free-given status.

Lord God of Saboath Lutheran Church, Christiansted St. Croix where family members attended. Photo  by shelley dewese

Lord God of Saboath Lutheran Church, Christiansted St. Croix where family members attended.
Photo by shelley dewese

My Bough Lineage(CAPS):

Generation 1. GEORGE ANTHONY BOUGH, (1806-1856) born in St. Croix, the son of George Bough and Sarah Beaudhuy. He met Sophia Lincoln she was born in 1804 and died in St. Croix together they had 2 Children: Mary Elizabeth and GEORGE A. BOUGH.

Generation 2: George A Bough (1831-1854) born in St. Croix met Emelia Elizabeth Petersen-Marcus the daughter of Thomas Petersen and Anna Catherina DeWindt. She was born in St. Croix April 13, 1833 and died 15 of February 1897. Together they had 2 Children: AUGUST CURTIS BOUGH and Christine Luce Bough-Jacobs.

Generation 3: August Curtis Bough (1866-1939) born in St. Croix was the son of George A. Bough and Emlia Elizabeth Petersen-Marcus. He had Eleven children including JULIUS CURTIS BOUGH.

Generation 4: Julius Curtis Bough (1889-1936) born in St. Croix the son of August Bough and Georgianna Aagard. He had Eight children including my mother JOYCE FLORENCIA BOUGH.

Resources provided upon request.

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