Sarah Beaudhuy Close to Home (#9 of 52 ancestors)

Week 9 (Feb 26-Mar 4) – Close to Home. Which ancestor is the closest to where you live? Who has a story that hits “close to home”?

When I look at the family tree and look at residences, my 4th great-grandmother Sarah Beaudhuy is the closest to where I live, six blocks over on 15 Market Street, Christiansted St. Croix. Albeit there aren’t any stories to pass down about Sarah. Through the evaluation of Wills, Census and Church records, I was able to get a view of her life and her way of life.

Market Street  St. Croix
Market Street St. Croix

Sarah was born in St. Croix, Danish West Indies, and was baptized in the Dutch Reform Church. From the 1779 Christiansted Anglican Church Records: Three mulatto slaves: Peter, Adam and Sarah property of Mr Beaudhuy together were re-baptized in St. Johns Anglican Church and took on the Beaudhuy name.

Sarah Beaudhuy,and her brothers grew up between being on the Betsey Jewel Plantation and a Town apartment on Market Street owned by White Planter Anthony Beaudhuy. Regularly, Sarah was leased to Danish families to work nearby as a house servant.

Anthony Beaudhuy liberated Sarah on April 22, 1797, and it was recorded in the Christiansted City Court on April 24, 1797. She received her Freedom Certificate on July 27, 1797 from Governor Malleville.

Sarah was among the alleged Free Colored populace. The Ordinance of March 16, 1776 secured that the offspring of free-colored women were born free. Hence, her two children took after their moms status. In any case, the free-colored populace was managed by serious limitations which were gradually relaxed after a while. She supported herself by sewing. Sarah had a relationship with a man named Bough/Bauch with whom she had two children. David, who died in adolescence and George Anthony Bough, who lived all through adulthood.

Market Street Christiansted St. Croix 2015
Market Street Christiansted St. Croix
2015

Now and again, when I drive in the town of Christiansted I envisioned how Market street was very noteworthy financially,for my ancestor who alongside many other woman peddling their wares. I generally consider my 4th Great-grandmother’s hardship and at the same time, assembling significant family bonds. As she matured, these same family bonds were displayed in the census where you see that her son, George was living with his wife and his large family which also included his mother, Sarah. Sarah outlived her son, George.

Sarah died at a ripe old age about 96 and was buried as a Moravian in Christiansted. Sarah Beaudhuy is the Great Matriarch of the Bough Lineage.

By shelley dewese

As I continue to search out my history, I am discovering how much I did not know. The more information disclosed about my ancestry, the more I learn and understand how I am the person that has evolved today. My family's research efforts have taken me on an enlightening journey back through the past in the U. S. Virgin Islands (formerly Danish West Indies) and Coastal Georgia. As with most people of Afro-Caribbean descent, my ancestry stems from peoples brought together by colonialism and conquest; it stems from people thrown together, albeit forcibly, by the throes of enslavement. As a result, my DNA tells me that my people originate in Africa, Europe, England, Ireland, Scotland, France, Lesser Antilles, and Leeward Caribbean Islands. Two collections made my dream to research my ancestors in the Danish West Indies a reality. I have conducted extensive research using the St. Croix Population Database 1734-1917, a St. Croix African Roots Project product, and a research and document transcription effort sponsored by the Virgin Islands Social History Associates (VISHA). The other catalyst has been accessing the extensive photo, manuscript, and microfilm collections at the Library and Archives of the St. Croix Landmarks Society at Estate Whim in St. Croix. My heartfelt thanks go to all my cousins, extended "cousin-family," friends, and research colleagues from the St. Croix-based Virgin Islands Ancestry Discovery Group, for their input and collaboration. I also want to thank the UJima Genealogy Group in Coastal Georgia and GlynnGen.com; webmaster Amy Hendrick has introduced me to Southern History and its people. This site allows you to transform yourself to a time during the Danish period (1734-1917) when life was both complex and straightforward. If you have any questions, comments, or need assistance searching for a Danish West Indies ancestor, I invite you to drop me an email. Its.sheldew@gmail.com I especially appreciate the followers' encouragement.

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