Talented Tuesday

LEVI YOGI BOUGH

I met my uncle Levi G. Bough in the 70’s when he visited his birth place of St. Croix Virgin Islands with his family from Switzerland.  Although he was no longer the Athlete and his body had aged, you could still see the traces of the athlete he was in his posture and the way he carried himself.  You knew instinctively that he was a man who took good care of his body, although he was off the basketball court for decades. 

Growing up, we heard all about his Athletic talent from my mother and other distant relatives.  They told stories about his skill as a basketball player, who received a scholarship to attend College.  Levi also was thrifty and earned money by selling newspapers, and shining shoes.    He was known for studying way into the night with a Kerosene Lamp.  Later he joined the US Army as a member of the 761st Black Tank Battalion during World War II.  After the war, he played basketball in Europe, where he settled with his family.

Yogi and Team-mates

Yogi, as he was affectionately called, loved to talk and could recall the statistics like it was yesterday.  Levi   Bough enrolled into St. Francis College in 1946 and continued his basketball career as the first black basketball player with the S.F.C. Terriers.  With Yogi as a starter on the team during the years 1947 to 1948, St. Francis College  ranked first in the New York City area and 20th in the nation as a defensive unit.  They destroyed the mythical Brooklyn title over Brooklyn College and St. Johns University, and were rated 76th in the US by a leading collegiate basketball summary that tabulated 790 Schools. 

“Taking it to the Hoop”

Levi graduated from St. Francis College with a degree in philosophy and psychology after serving as a basketball trainer and director of sports at the institute, but a government scholarship allowed him to continue his studies in Switzerland.   He went on to win 18 championships in basketball altogether.  Yogi went on to become a player and coach when he attended the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.  He took the game of basketball by storm and was deemed by Europeans “the first true American” for his accomplishments on and off the courts.    Levi “Yogi” Bough died in Switzerland in 2008.

Levi Bough was featured for his skills and talent on the basketball court, in the St. Croix Avis Newspaper in July 2006 as “A true Crucian emblem”

 

 

By shelley dewese

As I continue to search out my history, I am discovering how much I did not know. The more information that is disclosed about my ancestry, the more I learn and understand how I am the person that has evolved today. As a native New Yorker, with roots in Coastal Georgia and deep roots in the Danish West Indies, now the Virgin Islands of the United States or commonly referred to as the United States Virgin Islands, I have always had a yearning to return to my maternal homeland. In September of 1976, my family and I relocated back to St. Croix. While living in New York, I was always telling my friends about my trip back home, but here I was actually waking up every day, walking among the streets and people that I have identified myself with all of my life. At the time, I was not involved in any genealogical work, but I knew there was a missing link that became completed after I was offered the opportunity to transfer Danish documents into a database. That opened up my world and I realize that this was my niche. I now had the tools to explore and document my ancestry. Growing up, my mother always impressed upon her children the pride in being a “Bough”, which was her surname. Now I was able to track where that pride came from, through participating in family history projects and meeting new family, as we gathered together for the Bough Family Reunion on St. Croix in July of 2012. As I continued to research, I found my passion extending to photography. Sunsets and street art are my favorite features, as shown in my tumblr blog http://minkyadoo.tumblr.com/ I also began blogging, and found that it has help me to improve my writing skills. Through the comments and well wishes, I have been encouraged to continue to write the stories and events of my life. Whether or not your roots trace back to the Danish West Indies, you will find a beautiful tapestry of life that reflects our “baseball and apple pie”. This site affords you the chance to transform yourself to a time during the Danish period (1734-1917) where life was both simple and complex. If you have any questions, comments, or need assistance in searching for a Danish West Indies ancestor, I invite you to drop me an email.

2 comments

  1. I remember Yogi with warm affection. Even though I had never met him in person, I had the honor and pleasure of speaking with him while in Lausanne, Switzerland. As he heard my name, the first remark he made is that ‘we were cousins’. He proceeded to sing a few calypsos to me, and I happily joined in at my end. You should have heard the duo. It would have brought a smile to your face. It was good to hear a Crucian voice on the other end of the line. We spoke for a while and had a grand ole time. After attempting to call him again, in order to let him know that we were on our way to Italian Switzerland, and would like to pay him a visit, we received no answer. This was in 2008. May God bless him and may Abba look over his family.

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